Overcome Low Self-esteem

Self-esteem – an internal level of self-worth and self-acceptance. Low self-esteem can mean that you view yourself in a negative light or feel as though you are lacking in a certain attribution. It forms part of a paradigm which includes the concepts of confidence and happiness. The three can greatly influence each other both positively or negatively. Feeling negative about how you look, feel, work or what you eat can impact on any of these. Dealing with low self-esteem can involve an investigation of these key areas and a focus on building self-acceptance. 

If you are experiencing any of the issues below, please do get in touch.
 

  • Low self-esteem (feeling negative towards oneself)

  • Low confidence (not feeling confident in accepting oneself)

  • Feeling unhappy (not accepting yourself and allowing yourself to be happy)

  • Low social self-esteem (feeling that others lower your mood or self-esteem)

  • Any other aspect of self-esteem, confidence or happiness

Potential Resolutions
The coaching provided by Weston Psychology draws on a range of psychological treatment approaches dependant on each individual's needs and preferences. Listed below are several therapeutic approaches to boosting self-esteem.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or CBT as it is more widely known is a method by which your problem thoughts, feelings and behaviours are identified and targeted for change. It can require you to challenge those unwanted and unhelpful thought processes in order to finally break free of them. CBT is one of the most popular and effective methods for increasing self-esteem, a combination approach of CBT and CFT (see below) is recommended. 

Compassion-Focused Therapy or CFT is especially helpful for people who have a high number of self-critical thoughts which so often accompany depression. It allows you to move away from negative states such as low mood or high stress and develop what is called your soothing system. This form of therapy is often used in conjunction with mindfulness techniques.

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